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How to Teach the F Sound and V Sound

When you are teaching the F sound and V sounds to your child, there are a few things to keep in mind. First of all, it is important to make sure that your child is making the sound correctly. If they are not, then it will be very difficult for them to learn how to say the sound correctly. In this blog, we will be discussing how to make sure your child is making his/her F sounds correctly, as well as some tips and tricks on how to help them learn the V sound.


In this article we will discuss:


F sound speech therapy

Introduce the sound

In learning a new sound, it is important to start with the basics. For children to master articulating a sound in general, they must first understand how the sound is produced in isolation. This is why we recommend that you introduce the sound to your child in a simple and straightforward way. You can do this by showing them how to produce the sound with their mouth, or by using a visual aid such as a mirror.


Once they have a good understanding of how to produce the sound, you can then move on to incorporating the sound into words and sentences. A good way to start this is by using simple one-syllable words that contain the sound, such as ‘fat’ or ‘van’. You can then gradually increase the difficulty by using longer words and phrases.


Teach how to make the F sound

To produce a new sound, it is better to teach it first in isolation, then in words, then in sentences. F sound speech therapy can assist with this!


How to produce the F sound in isolation

The sound F is a fricative. A fricative is a sound that is made by pushing air through a small opening in the mouth. Just like the other fricative sounds (S, Z, SH, and CH), the F sound is made by putting your top teeth on your bottom lip and blowing out. The key to producing the sound correctly is to make sure that you are not moving your tongue.


Learn how to teach your child the F and V sounds

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How to produce the F sound in syllables and words

Once your child can produce the F sound in isolation, it is time to move on to syllables and words. When producing F sounds in syllables such as “fa” or “fi”, the key is to make sure that the sound is not too long. The sound should be short and sharp. For example, if you were to say the word “fan”, it would sound like “f-uh-n”.


When adding the sound F to words that begin with vowel sounds, such as “afraid” or “of”, the key is to make sure that the F sound is not too weak. The best way to do.


How to produce the V sound in isolation

The V sound is also a fricative. To make the V sound, put your top teeth on your bottom lip and blow out. The key to producing the sound correctly is to make sure that you are not moving your tongue. The only difference between the F and V sounds is that the V sound is made with a voiced vocal cord, while the sound F is made with a voiceless vocal cord.

v sound speech therapy

How to produce V in syllables and words

When producing the V sound in syllables such as “va” or “vi”, the key is to make sure that the sound is not too long. The sound should be short and sharp. For example, if you were to say the word “van”, it would sound like “v-uh-n”.


When adding the V sound to words that begin with vowel sounds, such as “ever” or “of”, the key is to make sure that the V sound is not too weak. The best way to do this is to add a little bit of force when you produce the sound.


How to produce F and V in sentences

When producing the F and V sounds in sentences, it is important to make sure that the sound is not too long. The sound should be short and sharp. For example, if you were to say the sentence “I am afraid of the big dogs”, it would sound like “I-uh-m uh-fraid uh-v thuh big d-uh-gz”.


If your child is having difficulty producing the F and V sounds in sentences, you can help them by breaking the sentence down into smaller chunks. For example, you can start with the word “afraid” and then move on to the phrase “of the big”. Once they are able to produce the sound correctly in these smaller chunks, they will be able to put it all together and say the sentence correctly.


Practice the sound with activities and games

Once your child has learned how to make the sound, it is time to practice! Here are a few activities and games that you can do to help them practice:


1. Have your child make the sound of F and then the V sound. See if they can identify which one is which. Say a word that starts with the F sound (e.g., fan) and then say a word that starts with the V sound (e.g., van). See if your child can identify which word starts with which sound.


3. Make up a sentence using both the F sound and the V sound (e.g., The fan is on the table next to the vase.). See if your child can identify which words have the sound of F and which words have the V sound.


4. Play “I Spy” using words that start with the F sound or the V sound. For example, “I spy something that is blue and starts with the sound F.”


5. Have a race to see who can say the most words that start with the F sound or the V sound in one minute.


By doing these activities and games, your child will not only be practicing their F and V words, but they will also be having fun!


Assess student progress

As your child is practicing their F and V sounds, it is important to assess their progress. One way to do this is to have them read a list of words that contain the sound. If they are able to read the words correctly, then they are on track. If they are having difficulty reading the words, then you may need to go back and review how to make the sound.

Another way to assess student progress is to have them write a sentence using both the F sound and the V sound. This will help you to see if they are able to use the sounds correctly in words.

f and v sounds

Extend learning with more activities and games

Once your child has mastered the F and V words, you can extend their learning with more activities and games. Here are a few ideas:


1. Have your child make the sound at the beginning, middle, and end of words. For example, they can say “fan”, “vase”, and “save”.


2. See if your child can identify words that rhyme with words that start with the F sound or the V sound. For example, “van” and “man” rhyme.


3. Play a game where you give your child a word and they have to come up with a word that starts with the F sound or the V sound that describes it. For example, if you say “flower”, they might say “violet”.


4. Have your child come up with as many words as they can that start with the F or V sound.


5. See if your child can think of a sentence that uses both F and V sounds. By doing these activities and games, your child will be able to continue to practice their F and V sounds while also having fun!


If you feel like your child is not making progress, or if they are having difficulty with the F or V sounds, it is important to seek out help from a speech-language pathologist. A speech-language pathologist can help to determine if there is a problem and can provide you with resources and strategies to help your child. At Better Speech, we offer online speech therapy services convenient for you and tailored to your child's individual needs. Our services are affordable and effective - get Better Speech now.


 

About the Author

Mike L

Mikee Larrazabal


I am a Speech-Language Pathologist with 14 years of experience working with children and adults who have communication difficulties. I completed my Bachelor of Science degree in Health Science at Cebu Doctors' University and have been helping people overcome their communication challenges ever since.


I have worked with individuals of different ages, including toddlers, preschoolers, school-aged children, adults and seniors. I'm passionate about speech therapy and take great satisfaction in helping people overcome their communication challenges and improve their lives through better communication skills. In my spare time I like reading books, going hiking in nature and taking care of my dog Locas.

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