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Common Speech Delays in Toddlers with Aspergers

When most parents think of speech delays in toddlers, they typically think of those who are born premature or have Down syndrome. However, another common cause for speech delays is autism spectrum disorder, including Asperger's syndrome. If you are a parent of a toddler who has been recently diagnosed with Asperger's, you may be wondering what to expect and how best to help them overcome their speech delay. This post will outline some of the common speech delays that may occur in toddlers with Aspergers and provide tips on how to help them improve their communication skills.


In this article we will discuss:


Child with Asperger's playing blocks.

Is Asperger's considered a part of the autism spectrum?

Asperger's syndrome was removed as its own diagnosis in 2013 and is now considered a part of the autism spectrum. This means that people who would have been diagnosed with Asperger's syndrome are now considered to have autism spectrum disorder.


Autism spectrum disorder

Autism spectrum disorder is a complex condition that affects each person differently. Some people with autism can live relatively normal lives while others require a great deal of support. Autism spectrum disorder is a spectrum because it covers a wide range of symptoms and abilities. This means that two people with autism may have very different symptoms and needs.


One of the things that make autism so complex is that it is a spectrum disorder. This means that the symptoms and needs of people with autism can vary greatly from one person to the next. For example, one person with autism may be nonverbal and require a great deal of support, while another person with autism may be able to speak but have difficulty with social interactions.


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There are three levels of autism based on the DSM-V.

The first level is known as "Level 1 -Requiring Support". This level is for people who require a great deal of support to live relatively normal lives. They may be nonverbal or have difficulty with basic tasks such as bathing, dressing, and feeding themselves.

The second level is known as "Level 2 - Requiring substantial support". This level is for people who require a good deal of support but can live relatively independently. They may have some difficulties with communication or social interactions but can take care of most of their own needs.

The third and final level is known as "Level 3 -Requiring only minimal support". This level is for people who require very little support to live relatively normal lives. They may have some difficulty with communication or social interactions but can take care of most of their own needs.


What is Asperger's Syndrome?

Asperger's Syndrome is a disorder that falls on the autism spectrum. People who have Asperger's often have difficulty with communication and social interactions and may have obsessive interests in specific topics. Unlike people with autism, however, people with Asperger's often have normal intelligence and language skills.


Symptoms of Aspergers in Toddlers

There are a variety of symptoms that may be associated with Asperger's syndrome in toddlers. It is important to keep in mind that every child is different and will not have all of the same symptoms. Some common symptoms that may be seen in toddlers with Asperger's include:


Delays in speech and language development

Children with Asperger's may have delays in their speech and language development. They may speak later than other children their age or have difficulty using words correctly. They may also have trouble understanding what others are saying to them.


Repetitive speech patterns

Children with Asperger's may tend to repeat the same words or phrases over and over again. They may also have trouble carrying on a conversation because they may not be able to think of anything new to say.


Stimming

Stimming is a repetitive behavior that is often seen in people with autism. It can involve activities such as hand flapping, rocking back and forth, or pacing. Stimming can help children with Asperger's to cope with overwhelming situations or experiences.


Obsessive interests

Many children with Asperger's have obsessive interests in specific topics. They may be fascinated by trains, dinosaurs, or cars and want to know everything they can about their chosen topic.


Children with Asperger's may even know everything about their chosen topic but have trouble understanding and talking about anything else.

Difficulty with social interactions

Children with Asperger's often have difficulty with social interactions. They may not understand how to interact with others or may have trouble reading social cues. This can make it difficult for them to make friends.

Sensory issues

Many children with Asperger's are sensitive to certain sounds, textures, or smells. They may not like to be touched or may have a hard time dealing with loud noises.


Speech therapy for aspergers in toddlers

What are common speech delays in toddlers with Aspergers?

Although children with Asperger's do not have the same speech delays as those with other forms of autism, they may still have some difficulty with communication. One of the most common speech delays in toddlers with Aspergers is difficulty with social interactions. This means that they may have difficulty understanding and responding to social cues such as body language and tone of voice. They may also have difficulty initiating and sustaining conversations.


Another common speech delay in toddlers with Aspergers is difficulty with communication. This means that they may have difficulty understanding what people are saying to them. They may also have trouble expressing themselves and be prone to tantrums or meltdowns when they are feeling frustrated.

Finally, another common speech delay in toddlers with Aspergers is echolalia. This means that they may repeat back words or phrases that they have heard. This can be a way for them to communicate or it can be a coping mechanism that they use when they are feeling overwhelmed.


What are some common speech patterns in toddlers with Aspergers?

There are a variety of speech patterns that may be seen in toddlers with Asperger's. One of the most common is monotonous speech. This means that they may speak in a flat, monotone voice. They may also use the same pitch and inflection regardless of the situation.


Another common speech pattern in toddlers with Asperger's is stilted speech. This means that they may have difficulty with the rhythm and flow of their speech. Their speech may sound choppy or they may pause for long periods of time between words.


Finally, another common speech pattern in toddlers with Asperger's is rapid speech. This means that they may speak quickly and run their words together. This can make it difficult for people to understand them.


Things you need to do when you suspect your child has Aspergers

If you suspect that your child has Asperger's syndrome, it is important to get them evaluated by a professional. This can be done by their pediatrician or by a developmental specialist. A diagnosis can be made through a variety of tests and assessments.


Once your child has been diagnosed with Asperger's, there are a few things that you can do to help them. One of the most important things is to get them into speech delay therapy. This can help them with their social skills and communication. It can also help them learn how to cope with their symptoms.


Who can help children with Asperger's?

Pediatric speech therapy can encompass a wide variety of ages including toddlers, and especially those diagnosed with autism. Toddler speech therapy is an important part of helping children with Asperger's syndrome. It can help them with their communication skills and social interactions. It can also help them learn how to cope with their symptoms. Pediatric speech therapy can encompass a wide variety of ages including toddlers, and especially those diagnosed with autism.


Speech therapists target social communication such as eye contact, facial expressions, and body language. They also work on pragmatic language skills such as turn-taking, topic maintenance, and appropriate responses.


Occupational therapy can also help children with Asperger's syndrome. They focus on helping them with their sensory processing and motor skills. They can also help them with their social skills and daily living skills. They can also provide guidance to parents on how to best support their children.


Teachers at school can also help children with Asperger's syndrome. They can provide a supportive and understanding environment. They can also help them with their social skills and academics.


Down syndrome with aspergers speech patterns playing with Mom

Finally, parents play an important role in helping their children with Asperger's syndrome. They can provide love and support. They can also advocate for their child and help them get the services that they need. While there is no cure for Asperger's syndrome, with the right support and intervention, children can lead happy and successful lives.


Tips for parents of children with Asperger's syndrome at Home

You can learn a lot at home. You can learn about new things, like what a volcano is, or you can learn how to do things, like how to ride a bike. You can also learn how to be a good person and how to behave in different situations. Everything starts and finishes at home. So, if you are a parent of a child with Asperger's syndrome, it is important to learn everything you can about the condition. Here are some tips:


1. Create a structure

One of the most important things that parents can do for their children with Asperger's syndrome is to provide them with structure and routine. This can help them feel safe and secure. It can also help them with their social skills and communication.


An example of a routine could include waking up at 7:00 am. brushing teeth, getting dressed, eating breakfast, and going to school. Another example of a routine could include coming home from school, doing homework, having a snack, and then playing outside. Each household has different routines. The most important thing is that the routine is consistent and predictable.


Routines help children with Asperger's syndrome because they provide a sense of predictability. This can help reduce anxiety and stress. However, it is also advisable to introduce small changes to the routine from time to time. This can help children with Asperger's syndrome learn to cope with change.


2. Be patient

Children with Asperger's syndrome often need more time to process information. They may also need more time to complete tasks. It is important for parents to be patient with their children.


Parents should understand their child's limitations. Children with Asperger's syndrome often need extra patients and understanding to complete tasks. For example, if a child with Asperger's syndrome is having difficulty tying their shoes, the parent should be patient and help them through the process.


3. Be consistent

It is important for parents to be consistent with their children. This means that they should follow through with what they say they are going to do. For example, if a parent says that they are going to take their child to the park, they should follow through with that promise.

Consistency is important because it helps children feel safe and secure. It also helps them trust their parents. Additionally, consistency can help children with Asperger's syndrome learn new things. For example, if a child is consistently praised for doing their homework, they are more likely to continue that good behavior.


4. Promote social interaction

One of the challenges that children with Asperger's syndrome face are social interaction. Parents need to help their children interact with others. There are several ways that parents can promote social interaction:

  • Encourage your child to join a club or team. This can help them interact with their peers in a structured environment.

  • Plan playdates with other children. This can help your child learn how to interact with others in a casual setting.

  • Take your child to the park. This is a great way for them to interact with other children in a natural setting.

5. Encourage communication

Children with Asperger's syndrome often have difficulty communicating. Parents should encourage their children to communicate with them. They can do this by asking questions that require more than a yes or no answer. For example, "How was your day at school?" or "What did you do today?"

Child with aspergers speech delay talking while playing

It is also important for parents to listen to their children. This can help children feel heard and understood. Additionally, it can help them communicate better. For example, if a child says, "I don't like school," the parent should ask why. This will give the child an opportunity to explain their feelings.

6. Seek professional help

If you are concerned about your child's development, it is important to seek professional help. There are many resources available to families of children with Asperger's syndrome. These resources can help your child reach their full potential. With the right support, children with Asperger's syndrome can lead happy and successful lives.


At Better Speech we know you deserve speech therapy that works.

We have experts in your needs and assign the right therapist, not just the therapist that happens to be in your area. Having a child with Asperger's syndrome can be difficult, but with the right support, your child can learn lead a happy and successful life. At Better Speech, we offer online speech therapy services convenient for you and tailored to your child's individual needs. Our services are affordable and effective - get Better Speech now.

 

About the Author

Mikee Larrazabal


I am a Speech-Language Pathologist with 14 years of experience working with children and adults who have communication difficulties. I completed my Bachelor of Science degree in Health Science at Cebu Doctors' University and have been helping people overcome their communication challenges ever since.


I have worked with individuals of different ages, including toddlers, preschoolers, school-aged children, adults and seniors. I'm passionate about speech therapy and take great satisfaction in helping people overcome their communication challenges and improve their lives through better communication skills. In my spare time I like reading books, going hiking in nature and taking care of my dog Locas.

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